A few weeks ago, a subterranean lounge named Mailroom began luring downtown types to the financial district with the siren call of free drinks, food from Momofuku and D.J.s including James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem, Mark Ronson and Clara 3000. But there’s a twist….

 

While the setting may vary across the bar, the real constant is the quality of the drinks. The cocktail menu is extensive for a bar of its nature, on two sides of a postcard. (Get it?) While there is a beer and wine menu available, the cocktails are the reason to be here. The options give a great range from nuanced creations like blackberry jam infusions in the “Gin and Jam” to modern approaches to classic drinks with a “cold-pressed negroni.

 

An owner of The Surf Lodge — Montauk’s longtime party spot with a legion of loyal fans — is opening a Manhattan outpost called The Mailroom (110 Wall Street), with LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy as tonight’s DJ.

 

The new space, from the folks behind Montauk’s Surf Lodge, has a distinctly midcentury modern vibe, with Noguchi-style lamps, tulip tables, and handsome wood paneling.

 

A few weeks ago, a subterranean lounge named Mailroom began luring downtown types to the financial district with the siren call of free drinks, food from Momofuku and D.J.s including James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem, Mark Ronson and Clara 3000. But there’s a twist….

 

Located at the base of a WeWork building, the space is designed like a modish postal hub, with wood-paneled walls, tulip tables and an Andy Warhol poster.

 

Mailroom kicks off their Pancakes & Whiskey concert series tonight, featuring under-the-radar rock, indie and electronic artists every Wednesday. The shows are free (just RSVP) and if you haven't been to this handsome new FiDi basement club, now you've got a good excuse to trek down there. They've also got pinball and killer chili margaritas, so there are two more.

 

The incredible space is a nod to Mad Men - sleek, classic, but with some modern flair. "Inspiration came from the modernist design cues of the 1950s and '60s,” says Robert McKinley, creative director of Mailroom. “It’s layered with rich woods, brass details, and shots of color."